Identification and prevention of banking fraud and scams in New Zealand

Evgenii Babenkov
11 February 2022

Babenkov, E. (2022). Identification and prevention of banking fraud and scams in New Zealand. (A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the degree of Master of Applied Management at Auckland International Campus, Otago Polytechnic).  https://doi.org/10.34074/thes.5607

Abstract

The aim of this research is to investigate banking fraud in New Zealand and create a simple set of rules and guidelines for New Zealanders to avoid falling victim to modern banking fraud or scam. In addition, the study will help to understand technological aspects and forms of bank fraud and scams in New Zealand. Moreover, the research will examine NZ government’s and financial institutions’ response in the prevention and control of bank fraud including what has been done until now and what else could be done in future.

This research will focus on credit card transactions fraud (ATM, card presence, and card no presence), online banking fraud (digital fraud via mobile or computer), and scams in New Zealand. This research will build on existing research on card fraud and online transactions around the world. We will also focus on the current realities of the banking industry in New Zealand to understand different techniques that criminals use to mislead a potential victim and commit a crime. Moreover, an in-depth study of the proposed approaches to prevent banking fraud and spam will be conducted. Furthermore, how the government and its agencies (Financial Intelligent Unit and Reserve Bank) can help mitigate the risk of financial crime will be investigated.

This research will benefit New Zealand Government and it’s agencies, citizens, students, corporate managers, various financial and non-financial institutions, and academics who want to learn more about fraud, in particular about ways to detect and mitigate the risk of fraud.

Keywords: banking fraud, scams, financial industry

Evgenii's thesis was supervised by Farhad Mehdipour and Saba Saimei.

License 

This thesis is available under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International.